Dog Conditions & Life Stages

Dog Conditions & Life Stages

Dog Conditions

Dealing with your pet’s health problems can be stressful. Understanding certain health conditions your pet might be facing can help bring you one step closer towards nutritionally managing the condition.

Anxiety

Helps your dog maintain calm behaviour.

Arthritis

It is estimated that canine arthritis affects as many as one in five dogs adult dogs1. Changes in the joint may occur even before the clinical signs of osteoarthritis are seen. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Stiffness
  • Lameness
  • Reduced mobility

Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome (CDS)

Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome (CDS) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder in dogs characterized by gradual and progressive cognitive decline, resembling the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease in people.

Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

Disorientation

  • Dog stares blankly at walls, floor or into space
  • Gets stuck or has difficulty getting around objects
  • Does not recognize familiar people

Lack of enthusiasm and interaction seeking

  • Decreased interest or time spent in petting
  • Spending more time alone or away from family members
  • More clingy or fearful

Changes in sleep-wake cycle

  • Restless or waking at night
  • Nighttime vocalization
  • Sleeps noticeably more during the day

Decline in housetraining

  • Decrease or loss of signaling to go out
  • Decreased response to learned commands like name, tricks, etc.
  • Difficulty getting dog’s attention/increased distraction

Decline in activity level

  • Decreased exploration or play with toys
  • Decreased interest in playing with family members
  • Repetitive behaviors like licking, circling, chewing

Increase in anxiety

  • Increased anxiety when separated from owners
  • More reactive/fearful to auditory stimuli
  • Increased fear of places/locations/going outside

Colitis

Colitis is an inflammation of the colon, part of the large intestine. Colitis in dogs can be acute, beginning suddenly and ending relatively quickly; or chronic, lasting for weeks and recurring periodically. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Blood and/or mucus in the stool
  • Diarrhea
  • Frequent defecation of small amounts of feces

Dental

A pet’s bad breath can be a sign that your dog may be developing dental problems. If ignored, many types of dental conditions are not only irreversible, but can eventually result in tooth loss or cause severe health issues. But how do you know if your dog’s bad breath is a symptom of something more serious? Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Excessive drooling
  • Painful chewing
  • Gum discolouration

Diabetes

Canine diabetes mellitus, or a lack of insulin, is a common hormonal disorder in dogs. It most often affects dogs between the ages of four to fourteen (mean age of 8) and female dogs are more susceptible than males1. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Extreme hunger
  • Extreme thirst
  • Frequent urination

1 Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult: Canine and Feline. Fifth Edition 2011: 68

Epilepsy

Epilepsy is defined as recurrent seizures caused by an abnormality in the brain. It affects an estimated 1 in 111 dogs1, making it the most common chronic canine neurological disorder. While some breeds appear to have a genetic predisposition to epilepsy2, any dog may be affected, with many experiencing their first seizure between 1 and 3 years of age.3

If you think your dog may have idiopathic epilepsy contact your veterinarian.

1 2016 Veterinary Medicine Landscape Dashboard
2 Berendt M, Farquhar RG, Mandigers PJJ, et al. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus report of epilepsy definition, classification and terminology in companion animals. BMC Vet Res 2015;11:182.
3 Skerri_ G. Canine Epilepsy. In Practice 1988;10:27-30.

Food sensitivities

Food sensitivities and intolerances can develop any time- even after years of feeding without issue. Food intolerance in dogs generally appears as gastrointestinal upset or intense itching and scratching. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Excess gas
  • Intense itching or scratching

Gastroenteritis

Gastroenteritis is an inflammation of the lining of the stomach and intestines. Common causes of gastroenteritis in dogs include dietary indiscretion, infectious agents, food sensitivities and parasites. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Excess gas
  • Weight loss

Gastrointestinal disorders

Gastrointestinal disorders are one of the most common reasons dogs are brought to their veterinarian. Some dog digestive system problems may resolve quickly, but more serious conditions could result in weight loss or dehydration. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Excess gas
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an inflammation of the lining of the intestine. IBD is a chronic condition that may last your dog’s lifetime. The good news is that many cases of IBD can be successfully managed if owners carefully follow feeding and/or medication instructions from their veterinarians. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Diarrhea
  • Weight loss
  • Vomiting

Kidney

Chronic canine kidney disease is usually a progressive condition, involving the loss of adequate function over a period of months to years. However, medical treatment and dietary management may help and make your dog more comfortable. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Increased urine volume
  • Increased thirst
  • Decreased appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Unusual breath odor

Obesity

Excess weight is a heavy burden for a pet to bear. Extra weight on your dog can place additional stress on the animal’s heart, lungs and joints or even exacerbate pre-existing medical conditions. If you notice any of the following, ask your veterinarian if you dog may be overweight:

  • You cannot feel his ribs
  • His belly is rounded when viewed from the side
  • You can’t see a waist when viewed from above

Skin Sensitivities and Allergies

While true prevalence is unknown, it has been estimated that up to 15 percent of dogs suffer from skin allergies, or allergic dermatitis1. Allergic reactions often lead to skin inflammation, and the most common indication of skin allergies is scratching. These generally occur seasonally, but can extend throughout the year. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

• Scratching, rubbing or chewing
• Redness
• Hair loss
• Skin infections
• Darkened skin tone

1 Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult: Canine and Feline. Fifth Edition 2011: 130

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis is an inflammation of the pancreas that alters its normal function and structure. The condition can be acute or chronic and the inflammation can be mild or severe. The exact cause sometimes remains elusive but several culprits have been directly linked such as dietary indiscretion, trauma, tumors, and certain antibiotics and chemotherapy drugs. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Abdominal pain
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Fever
Dog Life Stages

Puppy

Your Puppy needs the best possible nutrition to support his development. A puppy’s growth and energy levels require food that provides specific nutrients and calories. The food should provide the correct balance and amounts of essential nutrients such as amino acids, which make up protein, as well as calcium and phosphorous. Contact your veterinarian for more information about the unique needs of puppies

Adult

An everyday diet for your dog should provide complete and balanced nutrition, contain high quality ingredients. Look for a formula that contains a quality protein source, antioxidants that support immune health and omega 6 fatty acid including linoleic acid. Living life to the fullest becomes easier when your “best friend” receives the quality ingredients they need!

Senior

As age sets in, your dog’s nutritional needs change and require a different type of care. The onset of old age and signs of ageing vary with size and between individual dogs. Contact your veterinarian for more information about the unique needs of dogs 7 years of age and older.

Looking for more information about Purina® Pro Plan Veterinary Diets® products or to contact a Territory Manager in your area?
CANADA Call 1-866-884-VETS (8387) | USA Call 1-800-222-VETS (8387)

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